Jesus Came For The Broken

by Ian Ebright

My daughter has two frogs that share a little tank. We feed these guys twice a week by dropping four pellets through a hole in their plastic roof. The idea is that they’ll play nice and only take two pellets for themselves, while letting the other two float on. The frogs were the same size when my wife and daughter brought them home six months ago.  But over time, one of them has gone to the dark side. He bites the other frog once the pellets hit the water. He lunges violently at the pellets, and ends up snatching most of them before the other one can even try. As a result, he’s a huge froggish beefcake, while the smaller one is wasting away and has also lost a hand (we think the beefcake ate that too).

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Filed under culture, faith, human rights, life

When the Holidays Don’t Make Everything Bright

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by Tiffany Lucus

The holidays, it seems, are here in full swing.  Our bodies are working double time to digest the week’s worth of food we ate in one sitting on Thanksgiving, and a few of you have already pushed your way through near fatal crowds attempting to get your hands on the most amazing Black Friday sale. Soon, the trees will be up, the music will play, and the baking will begin.  The holidays are the happiest, most joyful time of the year, right?  At least that is what I hear.

What happens when the holidays leave you feeling hopeless and sad?  What happens when everyone around you could not be more jolly and you are just hoping that January will come already?  What happens when that fake “no really, I love the holidays” smile fades?  I can tell you what happens; the season becomes a very lonely, isolated time of year.

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The Horrific Abuses of the War on Terror, and Why The American Christian Church Doesn’t Care

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Stress positions and humiliation at Abu Ghraib. This is just the PG-rated stuff.

 by Ian Ebright

“Let’s talk about waterboarding” former President George W. Bush said with an almost defiant shrug. There was Bush, sitting across from Matt Lauer in a recent interview, now bragging about his role in personally authorizing the waterboarding of key terrorist suspects- which we know occurred up to 183 times per person. “Because the lawyers said it was legal” and ‘keeping the nation safe’ were his favorite justifications, and what thuggish justifications they were to any person with even the most miniscule understanding of justice. And when the glib mockery of the rule of law was finished, and Bush had used every canard he could think of, Matt Lauer still had the look of surrender plastered all over his face, as if to say “I hope my questions didn’t offend you, sir.” Not that it matters all that much; the church, much like the rest of the nation, wasn’t really paying attention.

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Inside Africa Part II: Zimbabwe’s Brutal Conflict

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Photo Credit: timesonline.com

by Brian Robinson

At the conclusion of the first part of this article, I mentioned that it was obvious that South Africans viewed me as American before considering my race. Well in the next country I visited, Zimbabwe, it was even more obvious I along with my two travel partners were “the Americans” of the group.

It wasn’t a negative view they were taking, it was just that the color of my skin did not get me immediate access into the Continental Club of Africans. There was no window at the Harare airport for all black Americans to visit and receive a “Welcome to Africa, Cousin!” pin upon arrival (and, yes, I was expecting one).

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Building an Impressive Life While Missing Something Crucial

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Photo Credit: http://www.moderninteriordesigns.co.uk/

by Ian Ebright

Every human being is building a life and it’s a job that continues as long as we breathe. The only thing that varies is how we approach this task. Some people will try to assemble a life that is the equivalent of the perfect custom home. Every room, every appliance, every color, every texture and every fixture must be exactly as planned.

Planning and progress as we see it are understandable things until they become all-consuming things. Then the space within life’s structure begins to feel a bit cold. This construction, while still impressive, is also antiseptic, tidy, quiet and predictable. It may be a controlled and safe environment, with nice things to gaze at, but something is missing. 

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Brian Robinson Leaving The Broken Telegraph; Other Changes Ahead

Brian Robinson.

by Ian Ebright

Some notable changes are coming to The Broken Telegraph over the next month. First of all, Brian Robinson will no longer be writing for the blog. Brian was the first writer to join me here about 6 months after I launched the site. He’s been a regular contributor ever since November of 2008.

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When a Move Towards Tolerance Leads to Intolerance

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by Tiffany Lucus

The world used to be a much more rigid place.  There was one color “to be,” one religion “to choose,” one church “to attend” and one “way” to conform.  Everyone shopped at the same place, bought the same things, participated in the same activities and ran in the same circles; unless, of course, and God forbid, you didn’t make the “correct” choice to participate in that “one way” thinking. Then you were an outsider.

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